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Gentleman_l8astard #21 Posted 12 January 2020 - 03:54 PM

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View Postminitelrose, on 12 January 2020 - 08:44 AM, said:


alas nobody took the time to explain.


I suppose it’s much like me using an American or especially a Southern States euphemism here in Europe.  It gets so much more interesting when I attempt to translate it to German, sometimes it works out but more often than not it fails hilariously.  A perfect example is “going commando” meaning not wearing underwear but can also apply to eating something plane Jane like a hamburg without anything on it.  Another example would be when you have some old tool that requires an exceptional amount of force to use would be called “John Wayne”: “I got a pair of John Wayne pliers you can use”.  Here one would say the pliers need a “hakenkreuz” stamped on them :hiding:



Widd1 #22 Posted 12 January 2020 - 05:25 PM

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View Postjonty_2014, on 10 January 2020 - 05:48 PM, said:



 

It is.

 

I played over 175 games and it’s probably my favourite t9 med.

I’ve played over 1300 in my Standard B and now finding it harder to carry/get the big damages as  regular as I was getting early on in it. Maybe it’s down to the teams also but don’t want to go down that route enough threads on here about that. The playerbase is just getting used to the mechanics and better players don’t let you get the full 3 shots into them but WG in their infinite wisdom have already decided to nerf it next update I think along with progetto, it will sadly become another Charioteer good on release then left to rot. HE pen is amazing though.



llo1 #23 Posted 12 January 2020 - 06:24 PM

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View PostGentleman_l8astard, on 12 January 2020 - 03:54 PM, said:


I suppose it’s much like me using an American or especially a Southern States euphemism here in Europe.  It gets so much more interesting when I attempt to translate it to German, sometimes it works out but more often than not it fails hilariously.  A perfect example is “going commando” meaning not wearing underwear but can also apply to eating something plane Jane like a hamburg without anything on it.  Another example would be when you have some old tool that requires an exceptional amount of force to use would be called “John Wayne”: “I got a pair of John Wayne pliers you can use”.  Here one would say the pliers need a “hakenkreuz” stamped on them :hiding:


Ok here’s one for you, what do Germans call an adustable spanner........I am reliably informed that it is called an “Englander” ......because, simply because of the way the English make things fit when you don’t have the specific tool for the job!



Gentleman_l8astard #24 Posted 12 January 2020 - 07:17 PM

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View Postllo1, on 12 January 2020 - 07:24 PM, said:


Ok here’s one for you, what do Germans call an adustable spanner........I am reliably informed that it is called an “Englander” ......because, simply because of the way the English make things fit when you don’t have the specific tool for the job!


I have heard it referred to as an “Englander” but mostly by older Germans.  We Americans like to joke that it was created because British Standard bolts were so poorly made that neither size wrench of the correct type would fit it requiring then invention of the adjustable wrench. 



DumbApe #25 Posted 12 January 2020 - 07:39 PM

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View Postllo1, on 12 January 2020 - 06:24 PM, said:


Ok here’s one for you, what do Germans call an adustable spanner........I am reliably informed that it is called an “Englander” ......because, simply because of the way the English make things fit when you don’t have the specific tool for the job!


Actually its because Germany has used the Metric system and the UK used the Imperial. So a 10mm spanner would not quite fit a 3/8th, buggered a few nuts and bolts coz of this :(

 


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minitelrose #26 Posted 13 January 2020 - 12:22 AM

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View Postllo1, on 12 January 2020 - 07:24 PM, said:


Ok here’s one for you, what do Germans call an adustable spanner........I am reliably informed that it is called an “Englander” ......because, simply because of the way the English make things fit when you don’t have the specific tool for the job!

View PostGentleman_l8astard, on 12 January 2020 - 08:17 PM, said:


I have heard it referred to as an “Englander” but mostly by older Germans.  We Americans like to joke that it was created because British Standard bolts were so poorly made that neither size wrench of the correct type would fit it requiring then invention of the adjustable wrench. 


actually called a  clé anglaise  in French. Sort of  English wrench  if you want.

so there has to be some truth at the bottom of this.
 


Edited by minitelrose, 13 January 2020 - 12:23 AM.

Read my guides there

"I want the game to be just how it was launched, no MM limitations for platoons, some unbalanced match once in a while, and friendly fire should come back as well. The only thing they should remove is statistics." -phony1907, 08 July 2016, 05:45pm - 

I want just that, and replay files.

 


Gentleman_l8astard #27 Posted 13 January 2020 - 01:15 AM

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View Postminitelrose, on 13 January 2020 - 01:22 AM, said:


actually called a  clé anglaise  in French. Sort of  English wrench  if you want.

so there has to be some truth at the bottom of this.
 


Oh there is, and it’s a combination of Ape’s explanation and mine.  British Standard c. 1900-1930 was a pretty oddball size.  Both the Germans (metric users) and Americans (Standard users) couldn’t get their heads around the British system (this actually lead to the DIN Standard we have today).  Even tho it was Standard (Imperial) the quality was abysmal due to a number of factors (access to quality materials, quality of workmanship within the industry ect) that lead to the creation of the adjustable wrench.  I never saw many older British cars as a mechanic in the states but when I did I had a special set of tools hidden away (passed down from my grandfather who was a mechanic stationed in Britain during WWII) only for those cars because nothing else would fit it and probably round the head off.



DumbApe #28 Posted 13 January 2020 - 11:47 AM

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View PostGentleman_l8astard, on 13 January 2020 - 01:15 AM, said:


Oh there is, and it’s a combination of Ape’s explanation and mine.  British Standard c. 1900-1930 was a pretty oddball size.  Both the Germans (metric users) and Americans (Standard users) couldn’t get their heads around the British system (this actually lead to the DIN Standard we have today).  Even tho it was Standard (Imperial) the quality was abysmal due to a number of factors (access to quality materials, quality of workmanship within the industry ect) that lead to the creation of the adjustable wrench.  I never saw many older British cars as a mechanic in the states but when I did I had a special set of tools hidden away (passed down from my grandfather who was a mechanic stationed in Britain during WWII) only for those cars because nothing else would fit it and probably round the head off.


It was in these damp islands that the problem was solved and all the standards in use today owe a debt to Joseph Whitworth.

 

It isn't just the metric verses imperial of the heads, but also things like thread turns per inch and the angles of the surface of the thread.  While some might say it was down to shoddy equipment etc, it is rather more likely that an uninformed spanner monkey just didn't know that the Whitworth scale measures the bolt diameter and not the distance between the flat surfaces. In addition, the pitch angle can vary in certain applications.   

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standard_Whitworth

 

Oh and PS the accuracy of the techniques he developed was down to with one millionth of an inch! 


Edited by DumbApe, 13 January 2020 - 02:11 PM.

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